All posts in: Career Advice

 

When preparing for a job interview, you should realize that the questions you ask the interviewer are equally important as the questions you will have to answer.

At the conclusion of most interviews, the interviewer or hiring manager will ask, “Do you have any questions for us?” Insightful questions demonstrate that you are interested and prepared. Moreover, you’ll have the opportunity to judge if the company is the right fit. Get ready for the interview by visiting the company’s website to learn about the goods or services it provides, reading any online reviews, researching key employees and checking out the competition.

Bristol’s longtime Senior Vice President Peter Stern shares his perspective on the best questions candidates should ask an employer during the interview.

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Written by Fatemah Mirza, CareerTuners

Businessman on top of a mountain with a flag
Most people aren’t bad writers, but nearly everyone has a difficult time writing about themselves.

Our clients often get so caught up in their day-to-day tasks that they may lose track of the bigger picture. They’re not sure how to communicate their accomplishments on paper, especially when restricted to a mere two pages.

In this article, I will share with you our secret sauce for asking questions. By asking yourself these questions, you’ll be able to brainstorm powerful accomplishments to showcase in your resume.

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Myth vs. Facts Executive Recruiters

Not all search firms are created equally. From how executive recruiters operate to what industries they serve or job titles they target, jobseekers need to understand the differences. Armed with that knowledge, candidates and recruiters can work together to achieve the most successful outcome.

Bristol Associates asked three of their recruiters for input on what they felt were the most common misconceptions about those working in their field.

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It’s the job of executive recruiters, acting on behalf of their client companies, to discern what skills, talents, abilities and personal characteristics add up to the perfect hire. Often that mission requires “reading between the lines” when interviewing candidates. As a result, recruiters will ask questions and get answers that may reveal more than just the answer to the question.

In search of the perfect candidate, Bristol’s Ben Farber and Nora Bright each gave us their top three questions…and what the answers reveal about the candidate.

What Recruiters Ask and What the Answer Reveals:

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Ask a Recruiter: What Do You Wish You Never Had to Tell a Candidate. Illustration of an Executive Recruiter rejecting a candidate.

There are probably a million reasons a candidate doesn’t get hired. Some reasons lay with the client (the opening has been put on hold), and some rest with the candidate (lack of relevant experience, for example). As executive recruiters, the Bristol team regularly interacts with clients and candidates so they’ve got their fingers on the pulse. We’ve included feedback from the employer and from the recruiters themselves. We polled three of our recruiters: President Ben Farber, Sr. Vice President Peter Stern and our newest addition, Associate Account Executive Sean Parry to find out the news they hate to deliver to a candidate. 

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Social Media and Getting Hired (or Not) illustration of magnifying glass and social media on computerby Nora Bright

Social media and our online presence is an ever-increasing phenomenon. People on both sides of hiring, employers and candidates, spend more and more time engaged online. Candidates are looking for openings and researching companies; employers are looking for candidates and evaluating them, via social media, for potential hires.

As a candidate, similar to how you represent yourself in real life — your personal rules of conduct — your online self represents you, too.

According to CareerBuilder’s Annual Social Media Recruitment Survey, the number of employers using social media to screen candidates has increased 500% over the last decade. Now, 60% of employers use social networking sites to research job candidates.

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Coaches, Consultants, Recruiters – Building a Job Search Support System

Nora Bright, Vice President at Bristol Associates: “I recently met Alyson Garrido through a mutual friend and was thrilled to have a strong career coach to whom we could refer candidates. We often find that job seekers are unclear on the difference between a career coach and executive recruiter — which is why it’s great to have someone we can send candidates to when they need guidance that goes beyond the scope of our work as executive recruiters. In this guest post, Alyson sheds some light on what a career coach does and how it’s different from the role of both recruiters and consultants.”


by Alyson Garrido, Career Coach

Friends, bosses, coworkers, therapists, mentors — the list of people who can help you in your job search can seem endless. When it’s time to enlist a professional, I see many misconceptions about what a coach, consultant and recruiter do. Each serves a unique and beneficial role in helping a candidate land their next role.

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2016-ges-title-slide

For 16 consecutive years, Bristol Associates and Spectrum Gaming Group have surveyed casino gaming executives from around the country about their career goals, job satisfaction, and outlook on the industry. The data we’ve gathered provides insight into the factors that are most important to executives when pursuing a new position and their perception of the casino gaming industry as a whole. This year we received over 1,300 responses—the highest number of participants in our survey since inception.

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bristol-resume-typewriter

by Nora Bright and Ben Farber

In the search for a new hire, Executive Recruiters and hiring managers may review quite a few resumes. With a lot of competition for jobs, a candidate’s resume needs to stand out. Bristol’s President, Ben Farber, and Vice President, Nora Bright, offer firsthand advice on what to include that will set your resume — and yourself — apart.

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