All posts tagged: Kelly Nelson

[Image] Employer and candidate negotiating with recruiter in between them

By Kelly Nelson

It is common for the client and candidate to seek the recruiter’s guidance when it comes to the negotiation stage of the recruitment process. The recruiter needs to develop a true trust relationship with both the client and the candidate.

While the recruiter must understand the objectives and limitations of his or her client company, they must also understand the various motivations of the candidate. This results in the recruiter’s ability to pull both parties together in any negotiation. The experienced recruiter should have the ability to form creative solutions that draw on these understandings and provide meaningful benefit to each party.

Negotiating For Clients

The recruiter must be able to suggest creative solutions to clients that provide unique methods of reaching closure with candidates. Oftentimes, the client company is unable and unwilling to adjust the base salary when asked by the candidate. There are many ways to solve this apparent impasse. We have assisted clients in creating partial guarantee bonuses, sign on bonuses, additional perquisites, more aggressive bonus plans, and enhanced relocation packages that result in narrowing the gap between the two parties’ negotiation positions.

Read More: Ask a Recruiter: What Company Perks Do Candidates Really Want?

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Businessman giving cover letter document to another businessman

The cover letter’s purpose is to bring out the candidate’s personality and delve further into the individual’s skillsets before an interview. However, when recruiters are involved in the screening process of the candidates, is it still necessary for candidates to submit a cover letter?

We asked two of our recruiters, Nicole Santos and Kelly Nelson, their view on the importance of providing a cover letter when applying for a job.

Nicole Santos, Associate Account Executive

Nicole Santos, Associate Account Executive

“When working with a recruiter, most clients do not find it necessary for candidates to provide a cover letter. Rather than depending on a one page write up, the recruiter can directly ask the candidate questions to gather similar information in a more personable level. It’s easy for candidates to oversell themselves in their cover letter, and then fall short in the interview.

If a cover letter is required for a job, use it as an opportunity to qualify experience, explaining any achievements relevant to the job position that isn’t highlighted in the resume.”


>>> Read: 
Importance of the Thank You Letter

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business woman with question marks over head thinking about executive recruitment questions

Looking to find the right candidate for the company? Hiring an executive recruiter can be beneficial to employers – not only does it alleviate the workload of the search process, but it also brings an industry expert’s perspective in filling the position based on the needs and desires of the company. Before fully committing to the idea of utilizing an executive search firm’s services, it’s understandable for clients to have questions, especially if it’s their first time working with a recruiter.

We asked our recruiters to answer client’s commonly asked questions regarding the executive recruitment process.

Q: Bristol Associates, Inc. is based in Los Angeles, CA. Do you manage searches in areas other than the West Coast?

Kelly Nelson, Sr. Vice President

A: We have been recruiting on a National basis for the past 30 years. There was a time when recruiters were geographically focused. The advances in communications, the internet, social media, and job boards have enabled recruiters to reposition on a national (and international) basis. We regularly conduct search assignments in the Midwest, East Coast, Southeast, and Southwestern United States. With that said, the question is appropriate as there are recruiters who have not adjusted their focus. Our national reach allows us to source candidates for key positions in all market areas.

(Click here to fill out Bristol Associates’ Employer Inquiry Form today!)

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Woman interviewing a man

Wouldn’t it be great if, as an employer or hiring manager, you had a “sixth sense” and could know right away if you were hiring the perfect employee? Unfortunately, most of us don’t have that kind of vision and depend on a resume and interview to make our decisions. Those hiring want to be assured that the candidate not only possesses adequate experience and the position’s requisite skills, but also that the candidate will be a good fit for the company culture, ready to tackle new challenges and hopefully, be a long-term positive addition to the team.

Bristol asked Senior Vice President Kelly Nelson, who’s been with Bristol for over 22 years, for his advice on the best interview questions. Probing questions and edifying answers should help employers make the best hire.

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Audience Applaud Clapping Happines Appreciation Training Concept

This year, Bristol Associates is celebrating its 50th year in business. Started by Jim and Sandie Bright in 1967, then passed to Jim Bright, Jr. and Lucy Farber, Bristol is proud of its heritage and the fact that it is still helmed by family. Today, Bristol is led by President Ben Farber, nephew of Jim, Jr. and Lucy, and his cousin, Nora Bright, Executive VP and granddaughter of Jim and Sandie.

In addition, the Bristol team can boast of the long tenure of two of its recruiters, Kelly Nelson and Peter Stern. Kelly, recently promoted to Senior Vice President, began working at Bristol in 1995 and Peter Stern, also just promoted to Senior Vice President, has been with the company since 1989.

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Bristol Associates Employee Benefits Satisfied Employee

Sure, free food, “bring your dog to work day,” and a gym membership may sound like great perks but for most employees, it’s the more traditional benefits that count.

According to a recent Glassdoor Employee Confidence survey, 4 in 5 employees are looking for benefits or perquisites (perks) more than they are looking for a pay raise. The Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM) documented how employee benefits and perks had evolved in the last 20 years in their SHRM 2016 Report on Employee Benefits. While the report states, “Compared with five years ago, more organizations are offering monetary bonus benefits such as employee referral bonuses, spot/bonus awards, sign-on bonuses for executives and nonexecutives, as well as retention bonuses for nonexecutives,” it’s still the non-monetary perks that employees seek.

Bristol Associates reached out to four of their executive recruiters: Jenae Nordman, Peter Stern, Steven Kessler and Kelly Nelson, to get their feedback.

 

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